Old 11-02-2015, 02:36 PM   #1
Captain Congo
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Greetings from west Africa

I'm an American mariner, plying the seas of west Africa from Liberia to Namibia. Raised a Southern Baptist. I went from defending my particular flavor of belief to being exposed to reality. I've witnessed a lot of immorality and hipocrasy that has fueled my initial doubt in Christianity and religion in general. I've worked with animists, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists and catholics. I've started reading Dawkins, Hitchens, Dan Barker, Daniel Denney, Seth Andrews and others. I am hungry for truth and seek like minded people to share, learn and grow.
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Old 11-02-2015, 05:19 PM   #2
Smellyoldgit
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Greetings.
For one horrible microsecond I thought we'd been hacked by some Nigerian prince with a fortune to give away.
Reality can be painful for the weaker-minded to deal with, but once one realises just how vile the god-given shit sandwich reeks, truth soon gets easier to digest.

Stop the Holy See men!
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Old 11-02-2015, 05:23 PM   #3
Captain Congo
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I'm happy that I wasn't blocked due to my I. P. Address. That has happened before. Legit, respectful non-troll, happy to be here.
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:21 PM   #4
AtomJack
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Welcome!

I'm perfectly happy to take on a person's fortune, if it truly being given away, and not a scam.
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:36 PM   #5
Captain Congo
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@AtomJack, lol. I'm more like a broke toad than a rich prince.
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Old 11-02-2015, 08:43 PM   #6
AtomJack
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@AtomJack, lol. I'm more like a broke toad than a rich prince.
You will fit right the fuck in, in that case! Though that fictitious wealthy guy is still welcome to send a mil or two my way. I sure had to work for mine, starting at age 15. Shouldn't complain too much. After 47 years of grinding my nose into oblivion on that stone, I retired last year at 62. I was convinced for decades that I would just be found slumped over my desk by a fellow worker. I'm not a high roller (or else I'd still be working). In fact, I am one cheap sumbitch. Again, welcome!
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Old 11-03-2015, 06:40 AM   #7
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Welcome to our humble forums.

Always question all authorities because the authority you don't question is the most dangerous... except me, never question me.
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Old 11-03-2015, 11:00 PM   #8
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> I'm an American mariner, plying the seas of west Africa from Liberia to Namibia.

Ahoy there!

> Raised a Southern Baptist. I went from defending my particular flavor of belief to being exposed to reality.

Too many days at sea, out of sight of land, can do that to a man!

> I've witnessed a lot of immorality and hipocrasy that has fueled my initial doubt in Christianity and religion in general.

You just can't find better practitioners of immorality and hypocrisy than the religious, although Politicians are a close second.

> I've worked with animists, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists and catholics.

So have I, and one soon realizes the folly of trying to reason with a brain turned to concrete by the religion meme.

> I've started reading Dawkins, Hitchens, Dan Barker, Daniel Denney, Seth Andrews and others.

So many fascinating authors. Do you read them in print, or online? So many engaging debates online!
Before the Internet, it was difficult to find Atheist literature, the local clergy usually ensuring such stuff was kept off the library shelves.
A lot of the older literature is food for the knowledge thirsty, such writers as Joseph McCabe, or Madalyn Murray O'Hair, or Bertrand Russel, and their efforts are so available on the Web.

> I am hungry for truth and seek like minded people to share, learn and grow.

The quest for knowledge is what propels human progress. The Web is a great place for that. The evil enemy is religion.
Expecting Atheists to be a cut above, based on an obvious superior intellect that saw through the deception of Religion, it was a great disappointment to find that atheists were just a cross section of the population, with the usual mix of a few nice, smart folks, and the usual assortment of humbugs.
Here, it seems we're the spiders, waiting for a fundy fly to land on our web, so we can have some fun with him, before it flys off to more fertile grounds for recruitment of the gullibles.
So, be patient, and enjoy. And beware - those ocean voyages, bounding over the waves, the wind in the rigging, the stars overhead, the aloneness can lead to deep thoughts.

Use foolproof airtight logic on a mind that's closed and you're dead. - William J. Reilly, Opening Closed Minds
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Old 11-03-2015, 11:45 PM   #9
Captain Congo
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Thank you Sinfidel. I am always in awe when I'm at sea on a dark, clear night, looking up at stars and constellations that I can't see back home in the U.S. (due to my southern latitude here). Just this morning I was admiring Sirius, almost at my zenith, Canopus further down and, Crux rising just on the horizon as we make our way south, towards Luanda. I've been an avid, amateur stargazer for about 15 yrs now and I really appreciate what I can see in the southern hemisphere, even with the naked eye. Such scenery makes me realize just how insignificant we are in the great scheme of things. A salute to all.

Faith: the process of non-thinking and intellectual suicide.
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Old 11-06-2015, 10:38 PM   #10
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Welcome aboard!!
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Old 11-08-2015, 09:31 AM   #11
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Thank you Sinfidel. I am always in awe when I'm at sea on a dark, clear night, looking up at stars and constellations that I can't see back home in the U.S. (due to my southern latitude here). Just this morning I was admiring Sirius, almost at my zenith, Canopus further down and, Crux rising just on the horizon as we make our way south, towards Luanda. I've been an avid, amateur stargazer for about 15 yrs now and I really appreciate what I can see in the southern hemisphere, even with the naked eye. Such scenery makes me realize just how insignificant we are in the great scheme of things. A salute to all.

Never gazed at the southern sky, having travelled only as far south as Carolina. Grew up in the country, and marvelled at the night sky. But from teen years, lived in town or city, and with the light pollution, the night sky was hidden from view. Did save up and buy a Department store telescope, and do the limited star gazing that and the light pollution allowed. Later in life, I could afford a Meade 8 inch Schmidt Cassegrain, and did enjoy some more serious observing from a hilltop conservation area reasonably free of obscuring city lights. But, it's been years since the scope has been hauled out of the closet. It is nice to keep up with the latest in astronomy and Cosmology via the Internet. Finally the persecutors of Galileo are silent on our solar system being the only one with planets!

As a recreational sailor, I learned first hand the truism that a boat is a hole in the water into which you pour money. And a lot of work. All for a handful of days when the wind and weather are just right. But those times are an almost religious experience. The sunny blue sky, the clouds, the motion as the boat rides the waves, the sound of the wind and waves, the whitecaps, the curve of the sails, the sheer feeling of being alone and at one with nature, if there were an eternal bliss, this would be it! Sailing into Toronto at night, the city lights are a sight to behold.
But aging progresses, and a stroke that screwed up the sense of balance put an end to any thought of moving around on a heeling, heaving boat deck. So, we took up kayaking, hoping it might help retrain the brain. The first time out resulted in a capsize, followed by an attack by a swan who resented my intrusion into his territory. But, we persisted, and enjoyed a few years of kayaking. But, the aging process continued its toll, and sitting in a confined position for hours left me so stiff I could barely exit from the craft.
So, we bought a folding kayak, with a huge open cockpit, replete with sail kit. A joy to sail, but disappointment in quality and claimed assembly times. So, moved on to a Hobie sit-on-top with the mirage pedal drive (and a sail kit). Simply marvelous!
But, with deteriorating health, it became difficult to transport and launch the kayak, so those days are over. Had I to do things over, I would take up kayaking from the outset, and forget the sailboat!
So, boating and bicycling are just memories now. What is one to do, but shop, eat, sleep, and joust with the gullible faithful.

Use foolproof airtight logic on a mind that's closed and you're dead. - William J. Reilly, Opening Closed Minds
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Old 11-09-2015, 09:05 PM   #12
Captain Congo
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Salute sailor! I became enthralled with astronomy after reading David H. Levy's book, "Skywatching". I purchased a little 4 1/2" EQ mounted Dob and I was hooked! Sadly and ironically, the clearest and darkest environs that I've encountered are also the most impractical for using a telescope; in the open ocean on a rocking ship, lol. I recently sold my sailboat, a Compac 23. I too enjoy kayaking and can relate to the cramped confines. I enjoyed your swan story . I wish you many more years of jousting with the gullible. Waves at Hobotronic
A lazy summer day back home:

Faith: the process of non-thinking and intellectual suicide.
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