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Old 03-23-2006, 07:21 AM   #1
Bighead
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I work with a bunch of nerds, like myself. A question was posed this morning about spectrographs. Can a spectrograph see color? I think that it should be technically possible, but I am not 100% sure. Are there any scientists out there that can lead me in the right direction? I have a background that includes some radio and spectrum theory so I understand how the radio spectrum works basically, which is why I believe that a spectrograph should be able to pick up color waves, but some in my office, with the same background, disagree...any help here?
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Old 03-23-2006, 09:34 AM   #2
Tenspace
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Define color. Does color even exist? Who says a wavelength of 900nm has to equal red (or whatever)? :)

By using the word "see" you're anthropomorphizing the spectrograph. The way they work is simple, really. Check out this link:

How does a spectrograph work?

Remember, the radio spectrum includes light waves. Why should there be any difference?

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Old 03-23-2006, 10:49 AM   #3
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Point taken. I change my question to:
Can a spectrograph detect color? Color being the wavelengths between Red and Violet, or whatever is the generally accepted name of the highest wavelength visible to the human eye.

Thanks for the link, I'll check it out in a few.
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Old 03-23-2006, 01:02 PM   #4
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colour does not exist. It has the same basis in reality as horny and anrgy: that is, human responses to certain stimulii in their bodies. Can an electron be horny? (I hope not, or quantum physics will get a lot more difficult. In order to calculate a cross section (interaction probability) you'd have to factor in if the particles were horny, upset, or gay. If any particles are gay it's definately the J/ψ. )

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Old 03-23-2006, 01:34 PM   #5
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Oh come on!
You physicists have been calling particles "horny", "upset", and "gay" for years!

Healthy genes act as team-players. They are teamish!
Their winning plays are
salvations of an aliveness of which they are a part.
Only a fraction of genes are selfish/parasitic (and they
parasitize teams).
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Old 03-23-2006, 01:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
PanAtheist wrote
Oh come on!
You physicists have been calling particles "horny", "upset", and "gay" for years!
No! Strange perhaps, but not gay. It's about time all these gay particles came out of the closet though. The fabutron, the campion and, of course, the gaytrino.

You can always turn tricks for a few extra bucks. If looks are an issue, there's the glory hole option, but don't expect more than ... tips.
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Old 03-23-2006, 02:45 PM   #7
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I dunno... "Charmed" is pretty close to Gay.

I hear the fabutron can produce all three flavors of gaytrinos.

Bighead, for the definitive work on understanding light and diffraction, pick up Feynman's "QED - Quantum ElectroDynamics" .

"Science and Mother Nature are in a marriage where Science is always surprised to come home and find Mother Nature blowing the neighbor." - Justin's Dad
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Old 03-23-2006, 03:00 PM   #8
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Yes, that is an awesome book!

Healthy genes act as team-players. They are teamish!
Their winning plays are
salvations of an aliveness of which they are a part.
Only a fraction of genes are selfish/parasitic (and they
parasitize teams).
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Old 03-23-2006, 03:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Tenspace wrote
I dunno... "Charmed" is pretty close to Gay.

I hear the fabutron can produce all three flavors of gaytrinos.

Bighead, for the definitive work on understanding light and diffraction, pick up Feynman's "QED - Quantum ElectroDynamics" .
yeah, charmed is a bit gay now that you mention it. Don't forget though that the gay-psiparticle is full of charm

You can always turn tricks for a few extra bucks. If looks are an issue, there's the glory hole option, but don't expect more than ... tips.
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Old 03-23-2006, 09:21 PM   #10
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http://www.machinevisiononline.org/p...ls.cfm?id=1874
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Old 04-03-2006, 10:44 AM   #11
Martha Castro M.D.
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Quote:
Choobus wrote
yeah, charmed is a bit gay now that you mention it. Don't forget though that the gay-psiparticle is full of charm
Thank you for the enlightenment Choobus, very interesting. I also read that the J/ψ subatomic particle is called sometimes "the gypsy"
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Old 04-03-2006, 11:16 AM   #12
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Quote:
Choobus wrote
Quote:
Tenspace wrote
I dunno... "Charmed" is pretty close to Gay.

I hear the fabutron can produce all three flavors of gaytrinos.

Bighead, for the definitive work on understanding light and diffraction, pick up Feynman's "QED - Quantum ElectroDynamics" .
yeah, charmed is a bit gay now that you mention it. Don't forget though that the gay-psiparticle is full of charm
But it's flavor-neutral. Doesn't that make it bi?

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Old 04-03-2006, 11:17 AM   #13
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Quote:
TheMaker wrote
http://www.machinevisiononline.org/public/articles/archivedetails.cfm?id=1874
The page cannot be displayed
The page you are looking for is currently unavailable. The Web site might be experiencing technical difficulties, or you may need to adjust your browser settings.

Maker, at least provide a brief discussion when you post a link so we know what you're talking about.

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Old 04-03-2006, 01:05 PM   #14
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It's about how robots can sense colours. Doubtless he was trying to use it as some sort of counter-argument to colours only being a subjective notion. Quite how it would be anything of the sort is beyond me.
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